Archive for February, 2010

2010 Volkswagen CC Review – A test Drive Bashing

Posted on February 23, 2010. Filed under: Car Tangents |

By: Brenton Blawat

Originally Posted – February 23, 2010

UPDATED 9/21/2010 – OK… I was a bit harsh on my review, and honestly I was my first bitter impression of the vehicle when it was first released. I’ve had comments of “did you really drive this vehicle” and “worst car reviews that I have ever seen”. Well for starters, I did really drive 2 CC’s at Fox Valley Volkswagen, in Schaumburg, IL and another one at Hall Mazda and Volkswagen, in Brookfield, WI. Both dealerships are wonderful dealerships with very knowledgeable staff. My grip is directly with the Volkswagen CC. I’ve updated the entire article to display WHY I bashed the 2010 Volkswagen CC. So here we go again 🙂

——————–

This article is the first of many car reviews for 2009/2010 vehicles. I chose the Volkswagen CC as the first review as it was the most intriguing to write about out of the 20 or so vehicles I was able to test drive.

cc09scr_3qtr_performance_800x600

2010 Volkswagen CC 

In an effort to raise the ‘class’ bar for VW, the Volkswagen created the Passat CC to replace standard VW Passat. At a first glance, you see a Mercedes CLS-class but after closer inspection, you realize the branding on the front is Volkswagen. This immediately intrigued me, and a test drive was in the works for the vehicle. After the test drive(s), I thought, with such sleek exterior styling, how did Volkswagen get it SO wrong?!!

 

Interior – Is it really that Luxurious?

cc10scr_steeringwheel_800x600 pas10scr_steeringWheel_i01_800x600

Can anyone tell me which vehicle is the CC and which is the Passat?

With interior reminiscent of its Passat sister, I was really hoping for more. The dashboard gauges and steering wheels are exactly the same, while the shifter and the seats are slightly different. To answer my question above, the image on the [left] is the Passat CC and the Image on the [right] is the Standard Passat. Scary how close the interiors are. If the CC is supposed to be a ‘luxury sedan’, above it’s sister Passat, can’t they do something different other than the fake wood trim? – That’s about all they changed.

Why is this such a big deal? The Washington Times raved the Passat CC as having “classy-looking interior”. The new slogan speaks of luxury – but is it really? The Touch Screen radio is more of a gadget than a luxury option like the i-Drive on the BMW. The stereo is good but is known for cutting off at the top end when you are blasting the stereo – not so cool. I also do not like the fact that navigation is such a costly upgrade ($2,640) for such a small component to add to the stereo.

The ride is what I would expect from a German car with low road noise and it passes the door closing test. The door closing test is one where when you shut your door it is a solid thud. It shouldn’t have any radiating vibrations or rattles coming from inside the door or in the cabin. While the frame and chassis of the vehicle are solid, the interior still needs some major work to make you feel like you are in a luxury car.

I still don’t like the cylindrical shifter. It really forces me to stay away from playing in manual sport mode. When I am driving a ‘luxury sedan’ that has 280hp, I’d like to be able to feel like I can play. I just feel like the sliding the shifter to and from the manual sport mode just doesn’t have the same effect; much like having a shifter on the tree.

While I can admit that the CC’s seats are comfortable, I get very close to the same support in the Passat. The rear seat has a cup holder as part of the seat making the vehicle a true four seat vehicle. There will be no cramming three kids in the back and any person with young children that requires a child seat, be disappointed with cleaning the grooves in the cup holder and its cover. What about putting a child seat in the center like most parents do to keep their children in rear view? Yet another WHAT?!? Volkswagen moment. My second concern with this center console is hauling any items in the back seat such as a large cooler (one which wouldn’t fit in the opening of the trunk). I would be afraid of cracking the plastic on the cover of this cup holder. Good thing there are talks by Volkswagen to have a five seat option; but why not on the first release?!

The second gripe I have with the Volkswagen CC has to do with the headroom – more appropriately the panoramic sunroof. Such a fancy name for a vent and obviously a mistake to not design it to retract. It comes off as an after thought of “Do you think people would like this feature? Crap!”. The sunroof doesn’t retract it only pops open to provide added cabin sunlight and ventilation. If you get a VW without the sunroof, your headroom is decreased by several inches and any six foot man would start to get a claustrophobic feeling inside the cabin. Also to mention, during the test drive, I was fortunate to have a friend with me, and she confirmed (with her being 5’9”) she felt as if the roof was collapsing on her as well. This is because we transitioned from a Passat to the CC which has one inch less head clearance. It seems anyone over 5’8” requires the panoramic sunroof which was only available on the luxury package – (at the time of posting) – another “really??” moment. Thank god they now offer this panoramic sun roof for the standard model. Talk about being out of touch with your market.

Engine Performance

Performance? Nothing new… nothing real exciting. They still have the same 2.0T and VR6 engines.

The first gripe I have with the Volkswagen CC has to do with the 2.0 liter turbocharged automatic. The dual clutch system (DCS) (or direct shift gearbox (DSG); same thing) in the vehicle gives the feeling that you are consistently missing the gear at take-off, and during mid-gear acceleration (like the Lancer Rally Sport). While the salesman insisted it was the turbo lag – any seasoned turbo driver (such as myself) – knows that it’s the gear not engaging smoothly in the vehicle. To know the difference — turbo lag dips the RPM prior to an explosive take-off. The feeling you will get is that you are riding the clutch before it engages. The result is feeling like you are going to break the transmission when driving it. The throttle response is thus affected, and takes the fun out of driving the vehicle. When switching to the VR6 version of the VW CC, you’re immediately engaged and the engine grunt makes you feel – this is cool. The numerous reported issues with the VR6 engines require a second thought which purchasing the vehicle for engine longevity over 90k. JD Power and associates rated the VR6 engine the LOWEST in it’s class.

Midsized Sedan Performance Comparison

2010

Passat CC VR6

Nissan Maxima

Toyota Camry

Subaru Legacy GT

Dodge Charger RT

Ford Taurus SE

Pontiac G8 GT

Honda Accord EX

Cost

28,600 – 40,420

30,400 – 33,180

22,500-29,700

20,995 – 29,995

25,080 – 39,195

25,170-37,170

28,250-37,610

21,855 – 29,305

Engine

3.6 V6

3.5L V6

3.5L V6

2.5L H4

5.7L V8

3.5L V6

6.0L V8

3.5L V6

HP

280

290

268

265

368

263

355

271

TQ

266

261

248

258

395

249

385

254

0-60

6.6

6.5

6.2

5.6

5.7

7.6

5.3

7.5

 

Summary – If it’s a performance midsize sedan you’re looking for, the Passat CC doesn’t line up. In fact, the Pontiac G8 GT starts at $31,000 and has been compared to a reasonable BMW 5 series at Motor Trend. For starting $35,000, you can get into a 2010 Ford Taurus SHO which has 365hp/250tq at 1500 RPM to put you to 60mph in 5.5 seconds; or the Charger SRT8. I was being fair to leave these out of the above specs even though the VR6 is the fastest engine selection for the Volkswagens. So when you get yourself into an on ramp race to the top, be assured you can beat a Ford Taurus SE and a Honda Accord Ex.

Midsized Luxury Sedan Performance Comparison

2010

Passat CC VR6

BMW 3 Series

Audi A4

Infinity G37

Acura TL

Mercedes C-Class

Lexus IS350

Lincoln MKS

Cost

39,600 – 40,420

32,850 – 50,700

37,200 – 44,100

33,250-46,950

35,105 – 42,385

33,990 – 58,200

37,595 – 44,890

40,870 – $47,760

Engine

3.6 V6

3.0L V6

3.2L V6

3.7 L V6

3.7L V6

3.0L V6

3.5L V6

3.5L V6

HP

280

300

265

328

305

268

306

355

TQ

266

300

243

269

273

258

277

325

0-60

6.6

5.2

6.9

5.5

5.5

6.3

5.5

5.5

Please note for this comparison I decided to increase the bottom line price of the CC to that of the VR6 Sport Package.

Summary – With all things considered, it doesn’t look like the Passat CC can keep up with these vehicles either from a performance standpoint. In this section, the BMW 3 series is known as the hands down segment leader by Motor Trend. I guess it’s not that impressive of a luxury sedan.

How did they miss the mark?

Well lets see what others are saying:

“In its highest trims, however, the CC is more expensive than some editions of the BMW 3-Series or Infiniti G37 – cars that run circles around VW’s effort on the track and carry luxury car cachet.“
http://usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/cars-trucks/Volkswagen_CC/

“We must conclude that despite its similarity to the far pricier CLS, the $42,630 CC is too expensive to be considered a value-even against a Benz.” — Car and Driver

“Volkswagen blurs the semantic distinction between coupe and sedan, but at $42,650 (almost) fully equipped, we call it overpriced…For the kind of money you could spend on a V6-powered CC, you could haggle your way into a pretty decent BMW, for instance, or drive off in a platinum-plated, mink-upholstered Cadillac CTS with enough left over to buy a Vespa.” — Los Angeles Times

“Not only one expensive Volkswagen, but an expensive sedan among its peers. The 6-cylinder model is priced well above a comparably equipped Mazda 6 or Nissan Maxima, and within sight of rear- or all-wheel-drive competitors from the market’s most highfalutin brands.” — New York Times

“Nevertheless, if a serious sport sedan is what you seek, the Subaru WRX will clobber the CC every time at roughly the same price point.” MotorTrend

 

My Final Thoughts:

I still firmly believe that the Volkswagen missed the mark with the Passat CC in many ways. If it were a two door vehicle the rear seat configuration might make a little more sense, but it’s not. If it had a retractable sunroof it would make the headroom issue go away, but it doesn’t. If it was priced like other midsized sedans I would have given it serious consideration, and it wasn’t. If it has an impressive supercharged VR6 engine like the S4, I would have paid $40,000+ to get it, but it didn’t.

I can’t begin to tell you how awesome the exterior looks on this vehicle, but its extremely disappointing on the inside. If I were Volkswagen, I would take a serious look at their placement in the market and realize that they need to stick to either a mid-size sedan or a luxury midsize sedan.

Midsize Market Failures:

– Lower the cost of the vehicle

– Add that fifth seat that is rumored

– Add the Panoramic Sunroof as a standard feature (done)

– Reduce the cost of the tech navigation package.

– Offer a STANDARD 100,000 mile Power Train Warranty

– Offer a STANDARD 50,000 mile Bumper to Bumper Warranty

Luxury Market Failures:

– Performance is needed to keep up with the 300+ HP engines. It would make this car competitive with the Ford Taurus SHO and other Performance Luxury Sedans.

– Increase top speed stability over 130MPH.

– Chrome everything should be Standard.

– Rear side airbag should be Standard.

– Bi-Xenon Headlamps should be Standard.

– Run flat tires should be Standard.

– Front and rear park distance Standard.

– Better Voice Command System.

– Motorized side-mirrors.

– Upgrade the interior with different shifting mechanism, leather dash, electronic rear temperature controls, rear media upgrades, cooled seats, etc etc (its this kind of stuff that someone with money and wants a luxury sedan likes. Its the features we can show our friends like look at what my car can do that yours can’t).

 

End Result: EPIC FAILURE.

Updated End Result: Still Fails all of my points.

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PowerShell Script: Retrieving Distinguished name (DN) from A Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN)

Posted on February 22, 2010. Filed under: Powershell Tangents |

Thank you for visiting my blog. I’ve moved this article to my new book’s website at: http://masteringposh.com/powershell-script-retrieving-distinguished-name-dn-from-a-fully-qualified-domain-name-fqdn

While there are many posts that describe the code to do this function, there aren’t many posts that provide variables with meaning or actually describe the syntax. This post describes the method by which you can retrieve a Distinguished Name from a Fully Qualified Domain Name.

Quick Reference:

Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN): division.domain.root

Distinguished Name (DC): DC=division,DC=Domain,DC=root

Canonical Name(CN): division.domain.root/OrganizationalUnit/

If you are looking for a quick way to obtain a Distinguished Name or Fully Qualified Domain Name See this article.

See the full article at MasteringPOSH.com

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PowerShell Script: Distinguished Name / Fully Qualified Domain Name to string

Posted on February 22, 2010. Filed under: Powershell Tangents |

Thank you for visiting my blog. I’ve moved this article to my new book’s website at: http://masteringposh.com/powershell-script-distinguished-name-fully-qualified-domain-name-to-string

This article is designed to be short and sweet. This article displays the method by which one would retrieve the FQDN or Distinguished Name of the Domain. This is code is very useful for any operations in Active Directory. A must know for any scripter that needs to call the domain on a system without hard coding the value in the script.

Lets take a theoretical network that consists of ‘division’ subdomain, ‘domain’ as the domain, and ‘root’ as the domain root.

See the full article on MasteringPOSH.com

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Default Domain Policies Windows Server 2003 SP2 / Windows server 2008 R2

Posted on February 3, 2010. Filed under: Server Tangents |

By: Brenton Blawat

What would seem like a quick reference item to find on Google, seems to have been lost in the billions of web pages. This article is intended as a quick reference to what the Default Domain Policies are for Windows Server 2003 SP2 and Windows Server 2008 R2. Please note that while some of the policies appear to be identical, the hierarchical structure behind the policies are different.

Default Domain Policies: Windows Server 2003 SP2

+ Computer Configuration > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Account Policies > Password Policy

– Enforce Password History = 24 Passwords

– Maximum Password Age = 42 Days

– Minimum Password Age = 1 Days

– Minimum Password Length = 7 Characters

– Password must meet complexity requirements = Enabled

– Store Passwords using reversible encryption = Disabled

+ Computer Configuration > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Account Policies > Account Lockout Policy

– Account lockout threshold = 0 invalid logon attempts

+ Computer Configuration > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Account Policies > Kerberos Policy

– Enforce user logon restrictions = Enabled

– Maximum lifetime for service ticket = 600 minutes

– Maximum lifetime for user ticket = 10 hours

– Maximum lifetime for user ticket renewal = 7 days

– Maximum tolerance for computer clock synchronization = 5 minutes

+ Computer Configuration > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Local Policies > Security Options

– Network Security: Force Logoff when logon hours expire = Disabled

+ Computer Configuration > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Public Key Policies > Encrypting File System

– Administrator Issued File Recovery Certificate

+ User Settings > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Public Key Policies > Autoenrollment Settings

– Enroll Certificates Automatically

 

Default Domain Policies: Windows Server 2008 R2 64-bit

+ Computer Configuration > Policies > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Account Policies > Password Policy

– Enforce Password History = 24 Passwords

– Maximum Password Age = 42 Days

– Minimum Password Age = 1 Days

– Minimum Password Length = 7 Characters

– Password must meet complexity requirements = Enabled

– Store Passwords using reversible encryption = Disabled

+ Computer Configuration > Policy > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Account Policies > Account Lockout Policy

– Account lockout threshold = 0 invalid logon attempts

+ Computer Configuration > Policy > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Account Policies > Kerberos Policy

– Enforce user logon restrictions = Enabled

– Maximum lifetime for service ticket = 600 minutes

– Maximum lifetime for user ticket = 10 hours

– Maximum lifetime for user ticket renewal = 7 days

– Maximum tolerance for computer clock synchronization = 5 minutes

+ Computer Configuration > Policy > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Local Policies > Security Options

– Network access: Allow anonymous SID/Name translation = Disabled

– Network security: Do not store LAN Manager hash value on next password change = Enabled

– Network Security: Force Logoff when logon hours expire = Disabled

+ Computer Configuration > Policy > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Public Key Policies > Encrypting File System

– Administrator Issued File Recovery Certificate

+ Computer Configuration > Policy > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Public Key Policies > Trusted Root Certification Authorities

– Allow users to select new root certification authorities (CAs) to trust = Enable

– Client computers can trust the following certificate stores = Third-Party Root Certification Authorities and Enterprise Root Certification Authorities

– To perform certificate-based authentication of users and computers, CAs must meet the criteria = Registered in Active Directory only

 

Default Domain Policy Differences: Windows Server 2003 / Windows Server 2008

Default Domain Policies added to Windows Server 2008

+ Computer Configuration > Policy > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Local Policies > Security Options

– Network access: Allow anonymous SID/Name translation = Disabled

– Network security: Do not store LAN Manager hash value on next password change = Enabled

+ Computer Configuration > Policy > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Public Key Policies > Trusted Root Certification Authorities

– Allow users to select new root certification authorities (CAs) to trust = Enable

– Client computers can trust the following certificate stores = Third-Party Root Certification Authorities and Enterprise Root Certification Authorities

– To perform certificate-based authentication of users and computers, CAs must meet the criteria = Registered in Active Directory only

Removed from Windows Server 2008

+ User Settings > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Public Key Policies > Autoenrollment Settings

– Autoenrollment Settings: Enroll Certificates Automatically

** NOTE: All re-productions / digital copies of this content must be approved in writing by an authorized representative of BIT Tangents.**

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2008 BMW 335XI – Fuel Delivery Lemon Story (Part 2)

Posted on February 1, 2010. Filed under: Car Tangents |

By: Brenton Blawat

Part 1 – Lemon Law Over / Issue Logs

Part 2 – Contacting the Dealer / Manufacturer – UPDATED!

I apologize for taking so long to get this article posted to the internet. It has taken since January 23, 2009 till to June 2009 to come to a final resolution with BMW of North America. I am writing this article as a guide on how you can approach your dealership to assist you PRIOR to claiming a lemon on a vehicle to get a peaceful resolution.

Two IMPORTANT things to know:

1. Your dealership is NOT liable for any portion of vehicle failing when you purchase or lease a BRAND NEW vehicle. – This means that barging into your dealership demanding for a new vehicle won’t work. In fact, according to lemon law, your dispute is between the car manufacturer and yourself. – Be kind to your local dealer; they DON’T have to help you.

2. BMW is only obligated to follow the State and Federal lemon laws. Additional damages are typically not granted to anyone pursuing the lemon law. Claiming you will sue the dealership for thousands of dollars for lost time will get you no where but out the door. Stay calm and collected and the dealership will assist you.

Success! A FAIR resolution.

msport

First, a special THANK YOU, goes out to Dan Jansen of International Autos for being patient with my relentless calls on the delivery of my new vehicle. Without Dan’s assistance and understanding, I would not have been able to receive my substitution of collateral. Thank you again!

1. Keeping Records

As shown in my earlier post, I had to keep all of the paperwork for the repairs on my vehicle. While having an issue occur 5 times, is annoying, you have to remember BMW is great at providing a replacement vehicle while you vehicle is in the shop. Keep the records so that you can prove your case to the BMW of North America. It’s about the BMW doing the right thing; not that you’ve been inconvenienced.

2. Contacting the Sales Manager at Local Dealership.

The first step is contacting the Sales Manager at the local dealership. Tell them you have been having problems with your vehicle and are interested in performing a substitution of collateral. A substitution of collateral is basically a vehicle exchange. In a substitution of collateral, BMW of North America will buy back your current vehicle and trade it out for a different vehicle on the lot. This also works for leased vehicles (such as in my case). The difference in cost of the vehicles will be charged charged to you. However, I was charged the DEALERSHIP COST difference versus the MSRP cost difference. This saved me over $3,500.00 by having the dealership extend their costs to me.

The Sales Manager will be required to contact the service manager; but keeping the sales manager as your point person will help tremendously.

3. Service Manager Sign-off

The service manger is required to review your service records to see if the reoccurring issue has to do with the same problem. The KEY component is to remain focused on the actual LEMON Law verbiage with the service manager. While the service manager may say I replaced different components each time the law states: “The dealer failed four times to fix the same defect;”. The “defects” by law are generic; not physical components. (EG Car will not maintain idle on start)
The service manager will sign off on the substitution of collateral and it will be passed back to the Sales Manager.

4. Regional BMW Representative Sign-off

In order for BMW of North America to accept the substitution of collateral, the regional BMW Representative is required to sign off on the contract. In most cases if the Sales Manager and the Service Manager sign-off on the collateral, the sign-off from the Regional BMW Representative just becomes a formality.

Once the Regional BMW Representative Signs-off the substitution of collateral paperwork is complete and the physical delivery of the vehicle can be performed.

5. (Optional) Upgrades

In 2009, BMW released a 335 with a “M Sport Package” that I opted to purchase. I purchased this upgrade at dealership cost with Paddle Shifters and a few other extras to completely trick out the vehicle.

If you are NOT interested in upgrading the vehicle, the dealership can provide you either:

a) a new vehicle off of their lot.

b) a new vehicle to be manufactured in Germany.

Since I upgraded the vehicle with a package that was not available yet, I chose “Option B” and it took an extra 60 days to deliver the substitution of collateral.

6. End Result

IMG5 img7 img4

BMW of North America agreed continue my existing lease with a New 2009 BMW 335i X-Drive. This means that I got a 0 mile vehicle 1 year into my lease and my residual payout for the 2009 BMW 335i X-Drive is at the cost of a 2008 BMW 335XI. A GREAT DEAL, and completely FAIR to me. I still have my 45,000 miles to use in the remaining two years.

If anyone needs more details I’ll be more than happy to assist you.

FEB.1.2010 Update 😡

Thank you for the continued reading and comments on this blog posting. I have made a new 2010 resolution to update this blog article as well blogging more articles.

First Item To Address: Wheel and Tire / Dent and Ding Warranty Transfer

To my GREAT disappointment, the warranty that BMW promoted as part of the 2008 BMW 3 Series didn’t carry over to the 2009. This is a result of BMW now offering their own extended service warranty. I so happened to get a bulge the right rear passenger tire and after it was replaced on my dime, I got a nail in the side wall of the same side tire. Both tires costing me in excess of $600.00. Lesson learned – BUY THE NEW BMW WARRANTY!!!!!

Second Item To Address: The 2009 BMW 335 High Pressure Fuel Pump Issue – Strikes AGAIN

After about 11,000 miles and being out 400 miles of town, the High Pressure Fuel Pump issue strikes again. This time around, however, I was was traveling at a sustained 80 MPH on the interstate when it felt as if my transmission went on the vehicle. After pulling over, stopping the car, and starting it again, the car would function for 50 miles where I would then have to ‘rinse and repeat’ until I made it to the BMW Dealership. Not a pleasant experience.

Third Item To Address: Awesome Readers and Leaving Comments.

I appreciate everyone that has kept this blog #1 for BMW HPFP Issues. Here are my direct responses to my readers:

Kurt:

“The dealers offer nothing regardless. Like most owners, the legal pursuits was the only option. I was cool until I hit 50 DAYS in the shop. Nobody listened.”

Kurt – Sorry to hear of your issues. As frustrating as this can be, try a different dealership. Remember that the dealership is not responsible for a faulty vehicle. It is only responsible to fix the vehicle under the manufacturer warranty. Even then a dealership as a right to turn you away with – we can’t figure it out. Issues like the HPFP are difficult to troubleshoot. There are stories of injectors and injector rings being replaced to fix this issue when the issue is just a HPFP. I hope everything turns out for the best.

Nicole:

“.. i just bought a 2008 bmw 328xi”

Nicole – It is my understanding that the HPFP is only available on the Twin Turbo Engines in the 135, 335, 535, and X6. It sounds like you might be having a different issue.

Dan T:

“ 1. What does bmw do for used purchase under warranty? Usually lemon law is for new.
  2. With no fault codes, shoudl I be concerned? Why would such a costly car just go dead at a stop?
  3. I heard software for turbos needs updated, I have v27.2 and heard v30 improved performance, heard anything? ”

Dan T –

1. The Lemon Law in Wisconsin also allows for vehicle to be used as long as its under the first year of the warranty. There are other protections like Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act that provide protections for used vehicles.

2. Imagine the car cutting out in the middle of an intersection with a semi-truck (or train) coming full-speed in cross traffic. With no fault codes – absolutely should still be concerned for your safety.  The High Pressure Fuel Pump delivers fuel to the engine in the 3000 PSI range. If a turbo spins up and not enough fuel is being delivered, the car will die.

3. Performance may be better, however, BMW will never admit that. BMW rates the 3 series at 300HP which is borderline for high performance in insurance ratings. To keep the insurance ratings low, the vehicle is rated at 300 HP, while the engine is capable of producing well over 380HP with a tuner (Burger Motorsports JuiceBox+ or Dinan Chip). I hear the PnP JuiceBox+ is well worth the money; but very much voids the warranty.

Dave:

“ Purchased a new 2009 335 CI in August which had been running flawlessly until yesterday (6300 mi). The car started up normally, but stalled out when I put it in reverse and fuel pump sensor light came on as well as check engine light. Towed to the dealer and I was given a 335 loaner. Final diagnosis is pending, but I expect the same problem with the HPFP. Disappointing. Maybe the Cayman S next time for me. Appreciate the info… “

Bimmer to a Cayman S – you should be ashamed of yourself 🙂  On a serious note, a 335xi with the Burger Motorsports Juicebox+ at the stock setting will SMOKE a Cayman S. You have to remember the 335i is a 3.0 liter Twin Turbo and gets full horsepower and torque at 3000 RPM. The Cayman S is a 3.4I displacing 320HP at 7200RPM. Yes, the problems with the 335 are disappointing, but when my car is working, I wouldn’t trade it for any vehicle on the road (well maybe the new Audi S4).

If you get the 2010 Cayman S, please feel free to provide your feedback on the vehicle – I’d love to hear it.

 

Thanks again to everyone and safe driving!

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